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Tatry at sunrise

Paweł Gałka posted a photo:

Tatry at sunrise

View from Czorsztyn

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 22:05:13 -0700
tatry landscape sunrise
20180407-0I7A0168

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0168

Malabar Giant Squirrel/ Indian Giant Squirrel

The Indian giant squirrel, or Malabar giant squirrel, (Ratufa indica) is a large tree squirrel species genus Ratufa native to India. It is a large-bodied diurnal, arboreal, and mainly herbivorous squirrel found in South Asia.

R. indica has a conspicuous two-toned (and sometimes three-toned) color scheme. The colors involved can be creamy-beige, buff, tan, rust, brown, or even a dark seal brown. The underparts and the front legs are usually cream colored, the head can be brown or beige, however there is a distinctive white spot between the ears. Adult head and body length varies around 14 inches (36 cm) and the tail length is approximately 2 ft (0.61 m). Adult weight - 2 kg (4.41 lb).

The Indian giant squirrel is an upper-canopy dwelling species, which rarely leaves the trees, and requires "tall profusely branched trees for the construction of nests." It travels from tree to tree with jumps of up to 6 m (20 ft). When in danger, the Ratufa indica often freezes or flattens itself against the tree trunk, instead of fleeing. Its main predators are the birds of prey and the leopard. The Giant Squirrel is mostly active in the early hours of the morning and in the evening, resting in the midday. They are typically solitary animals that only come together for breeding. The species is believed to play a substantial role in shaping the ecosystem of its habitat by engaging in seed dispersal. Diet includes fruit, flowers, nuts and tree bark. Some subspecies are omnivorous, also eating insects and bird eggs.

The species is endemic to deciduous, mixed deciduous, and moist evergreen forests of peninsular India, reaching as far north as the Satpura hill range of Madhya Pradesh (approx. 22° N).

The Indian Giant Squirrel lives alone or in pairs. They build large globular nests of twigs and leaves, placing them on thinner branches where large predators can't get to them. These nests become conspicuous in deciduous forests during the dry season. An individual may build several nests in a small area of forest which are used as sleeping quarters, with one being used as a nursery.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 22:00:06 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram malabargiantsquirrel indiangiantsquirrel giantsquirrel squirrel india in animal tree wood

Sun

Roman_P2013 posted a photo:

Sun

Degernes Norway

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 22:00:31 -0700
black white nice degernes norway best shot sun view landscape snow grass sunset sunrise
20180407-0I7A0172

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0172

Malabar Giant Squirrel/ Indian Giant Squirrel

The Indian giant squirrel, or Malabar giant squirrel, (Ratufa indica) is a large tree squirrel species genus Ratufa native to India. It is a large-bodied diurnal, arboreal, and mainly herbivorous squirrel found in South Asia.

R. indica has a conspicuous two-toned (and sometimes three-toned) color scheme. The colors involved can be creamy-beige, buff, tan, rust, brown, or even a dark seal brown. The underparts and the front legs are usually cream colored, the head can be brown or beige, however there is a distinctive white spot between the ears. Adult head and body length varies around 14 inches (36 cm) and the tail length is approximately 2 ft (0.61 m). Adult weight - 2 kg (4.41 lb).

The Indian giant squirrel is an upper-canopy dwelling species, which rarely leaves the trees, and requires "tall profusely branched trees for the construction of nests." It travels from tree to tree with jumps of up to 6 m (20 ft). When in danger, the Ratufa indica often freezes or flattens itself against the tree trunk, instead of fleeing. Its main predators are the birds of prey and the leopard. The Giant Squirrel is mostly active in the early hours of the morning and in the evening, resting in the midday. They are typically solitary animals that only come together for breeding. The species is believed to play a substantial role in shaping the ecosystem of its habitat by engaging in seed dispersal. Diet includes fruit, flowers, nuts and tree bark. Some subspecies are omnivorous, also eating insects and bird eggs.

The species is endemic to deciduous, mixed deciduous, and moist evergreen forests of peninsular India, reaching as far north as the Satpura hill range of Madhya Pradesh (approx. 22° N).

The Indian Giant Squirrel lives alone or in pairs. They build large globular nests of twigs and leaves, placing them on thinner branches where large predators can't get to them. These nests become conspicuous in deciduous forests during the dry season. An individual may build several nests in a small area of forest which are used as sleeping quarters, with one being used as a nursery.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 22:00:07 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram malabargiantsquirrel indiangiantsquirrel giantsquirrel squirrel india in animal tree wood

20180407-0I7A0071

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0071

White-spotted Fantail

The white-spotted fantail or spot-breasted fantail (Rhipidura albogularis) is a small passerine bird. It is found in forest, scrub and cultivation in southern and central India. It was formerly considered a subspecies of the white-throated fantail.

The adult white-spotted fantail is about 19 cm long. It has a dark fan-shaped tail, edged in white, and white supercilium and throat. Birds are mainly slate grey above, with a black eye mask, and a white throat and eyebrow. It has whitish underparts, and a grey breast band that is spotted white.

The white-spotted fantail lays three eggs in a small cup nest in a tree.

The white-spotted fantail is insectivorous, and often fans its tail as it moves through the undergrowth.

Not normally renowned as a songster, the male uses a fixed and unmistakable pattern of musical notes in its call. The notes are loud and normally divided into two stanzas – the first with 5–6 trilling notes rising and falling, followed by 4–5 notes rising up the scale and ending in the highest note.

Birds use the same song year after year, with progressively small changes, with the result that the song sounds very different after 4–5 years. The male's call is a valuable tool in detection and identification of the bird.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:52:03 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram india in whitespottedfantail fantail wood tree
20180407-0I7A0064

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0064

White-spotted Fantail

The white-spotted fantail or spot-breasted fantail (Rhipidura albogularis) is a small passerine bird. It is found in forest, scrub and cultivation in southern and central India. It was formerly considered a subspecies of the white-throated fantail.

The adult white-spotted fantail is about 19 cm long. It has a dark fan-shaped tail, edged in white, and white supercilium and throat. Birds are mainly slate grey above, with a black eye mask, and a white throat and eyebrow. It has whitish underparts, and a grey breast band that is spotted white.

The white-spotted fantail lays three eggs in a small cup nest in a tree.

The white-spotted fantail is insectivorous, and often fans its tail as it moves through the undergrowth.

Not normally renowned as a songster, the male uses a fixed and unmistakable pattern of musical notes in its call. The notes are loud and normally divided into two stanzas – the first with 5–6 trilling notes rising and falling, followed by 4–5 notes rising up the scale and ending in the highest note.

Birds use the same song year after year, with progressively small changes, with the result that the song sounds very different after 4–5 years. The male's call is a valuable tool in detection and identification of the bird.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:52:03 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram india in whitespottedfantail fantail wood tree

20180407-0I7A0067

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0067

White-spotted Fantail

The white-spotted fantail or spot-breasted fantail (Rhipidura albogularis) is a small passerine bird. It is found in forest, scrub and cultivation in southern and central India. It was formerly considered a subspecies of the white-throated fantail.

The adult white-spotted fantail is about 19 cm long. It has a dark fan-shaped tail, edged in white, and white supercilium and throat. Birds are mainly slate grey above, with a black eye mask, and a white throat and eyebrow. It has whitish underparts, and a grey breast band that is spotted white.

The white-spotted fantail lays three eggs in a small cup nest in a tree.

The white-spotted fantail is insectivorous, and often fans its tail as it moves through the undergrowth.

Not normally renowned as a songster, the male uses a fixed and unmistakable pattern of musical notes in its call. The notes are loud and normally divided into two stanzas – the first with 5–6 trilling notes rising and falling, followed by 4–5 notes rising up the scale and ending in the highest note.

Birds use the same song year after year, with progressively small changes, with the result that the song sounds very different after 4–5 years. The male's call is a valuable tool in detection and identification of the bird.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:52:03 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram india in whitespottedfantail fantail wood tree
03.31.2018 | Chicago, USA

kris.nicholson posted a photo:

03.31.2018 | Chicago, USA

Sunrise over the Addison Stop

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:53:47 -0700
architecture buildings chicago city digital fuji lakeview mirrorless morning sunrise x100

20180407-0I7A0034

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0034

White-spotted Fantail

The white-spotted fantail or spot-breasted fantail (Rhipidura albogularis) is a small passerine bird. It is found in forest, scrub and cultivation in southern and central India. It was formerly considered a subspecies of the white-throated fantail.

The adult white-spotted fantail is about 19 cm long. It has a dark fan-shaped tail, edged in white, and white supercilium and throat. Birds are mainly slate grey above, with a black eye mask, and a white throat and eyebrow. It has whitish underparts, and a grey breast band that is spotted white.

The white-spotted fantail lays three eggs in a small cup nest in a tree.

The white-spotted fantail is insectivorous, and often fans its tail as it moves through the undergrowth.

Not normally renowned as a songster, the male uses a fixed and unmistakable pattern of musical notes in its call. The notes are loud and normally divided into two stanzas – the first with 5–6 trilling notes rising and falling, followed by 4–5 notes rising up the scale and ending in the highest note.

Birds use the same song year after year, with progressively small changes, with the result that the song sounds very different after 4–5 years. The male's call is a valuable tool in detection and identification of the bird.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:52:00 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple umamaheshwaram india in whitespottedfantail fantail wood tree
20180407-0I7A0119

siddharthx posted a photo:

20180407-0I7A0119

Common Iora

The common iora (Aegithina tiphia) is a small passerine bird found across the tropical Indian subcontinent with populations showing plumage variations, some of which are designated as subspecies. A species found in scrub and forest, it is easily detected from its loud whistles and the bright colours. During the breeding season, males display by fluffing up their feathers and spiral in the air appearing like a green, black, yellow and white ball.

Ioras have a pointed and notched beak with a culmen that is straight. The common iora is sexually dimorphic, males in the breeding season have a black cap and back adding to a black wing and tail at all seasons. Females have greenish wings and an olive tail. The undersides of both are yellow and the two white bars on the wings of the male are particularly prominent in their breeding plumage. The males in breeding plumage have a very variable distribution of the black on the upperparts and can be confused with Marshall's iora, however, the latter always has white tips to the tail. The nominate subspecies is found along the Himalayas and males of this population are very similar to females or have only a small amount of black on the crown. In northwestern India, septentrionalis is brighter yellow than others and in the northern plains of India humei males in breeding plumage have a black cap and olive on the upper mantle. In southwestern India and Sri Lanka multicolor has the breeding males with a jet black cap and mantle. The forms in the rest of southern India are intermediate between multicolor and humei with more grey-green on the rump (formerly considered as deignani but now used for the Burmese population).

Several other populations across Southeast Asia are designated as subspecies including philipi of southern China and northern Thailand/Laos, deignani of Myanmar, horizoptera of southern Myanmar and the island chain of Sumatra, cambodiana of Cambodia, aeqanimis of Palawan and northern Borneo, viridis of Borneo and scapularis of Java and Bali.

Ioras forage in trees in small groups, gleaning among the branches for insects. They sometimes join mixed species feeding flocks. The call is a mixture of churrs, chattering and whistles, and the song is a trilled wheeeee-tee. They may sometimes imitate the calls of other birds such as drongos.

During the breeding season, mainly after the monsoons, the male performs an acrobatic courtship display, darting up into the air fluffing up all his feathers, especially those on the pale green rump, then spiralling down to the original perch. Once he lands, he spreads his tail and droops his wings. Two to four greenish white eggs are laid in a small and compact cup-shaped nest made out of grass and bound with cobwebs and placed in the fork of a tree. Both male and female incubate and eggs hatch after about 14 days. Nests predators include snakes, lizards, crow-pheasant and crows. Nests may also be brood-parasitized by the banded bay cuckoo.

Ioras moult twice in a year and the plumage variation makes them somewhat complicated for plumage based separation of the populations.

A species of Haemoproteus, H. aethiginae, was described from a specimen of the common iora from Goa.

Mon, 23 Apr 2018 21:57:44 -0700
achampet bird birdwatching birdsofindia birdsoftelangana canon canon7dmkii closerange dawn dawnsunriseumamaheshwaram ef100400f4556isii goldenhour portraiture sunrise telangana umamaheshwaramtemple india in commoniora iora

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